It Has Been Zero Days: The Important Lesson of Casey Fury.

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In May of 2012, a shipyard worker aptly named Casey Fury wanted to leave work early so he did what anybody would have done.

He set a box of rags on fire.

The thing is, Casey Fury was working on a nuclear submarine. He thought there’d be a little smoke, he’d cough dramatically a couple of times and they’d send his sorry ass home. Instead, the fire got a teensy weensy bit out of control. Over 100 firefighters fought Casey’s fire for 12 hours but alas, the USS Miami was a mess.

The original estimate for repairs was $450,000,000. Yes. Fourhundredandfiftymilliondollars. You could burn Detroit to the ground and not cause that much damage on a dollar basis.

As it turns out with most government estimates, $450 million was a pipe dream.

On further review, as they say in the NFL, it was decided that Casey Fury’s ruse to get to the Dew Drop Inn a little early one Friday had a final price tag of $700 million. But the USS Miami was already 24 years old and while $450 million is just the cost of doing business, $700 million was deemed too steep.

The decision was made to give up the ghost and spend a paltry $54 million to bury the nuclear innards in the cool depths of the Idaho countryside, decommission the old girl and cut her up for scrap which is what they’re doing as you read this.

So, when you feel like the dumbest person at the office for making “a massive error in judgement,” think of Casey Fury. He’s cooling his fuzzy jets in Federal Prison for 17 years, the entire time hoping that no one asks him what he’s in for.

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Author: wordsrangtrue

Brian Boyd has served in sales management and operational executive roles in Silicon Valley for over 25 years. His interests include the business life, wine and the wine business, music, film and social media.

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