It’s Time to Forget Rotary Phones.

When the internet really got going in the early 90s, it was first a curiosity and then a revelation. But it was not our ‘reality’. It was another way to do things. You had the ‘real’ way to do something and you had the internet way. There quickly became some things that were largely adopted by the general population. In the business world, Email would be an example.  Other things, at the office and at home, would take some time.

Everything suggested by the ‘internet bubble’ companies in the mid to late 90s was measured against the template of how we had been doing it. Dictionaries, Yellow Pages and encyclopedias were tentatively supplanted.  Restaurant reservations were made with a telephone. It was odd to meet someone online. If you did, for whatever reason, you would not disclose that unless pressed. Any training or education received online was assumed to be subpar or second class.

Fast forward to today. Anyone under 30 expects only one thing from the internet: Everything.

Forget all of that stuff about how funny it is that they don’t remember turntables, rotary phones, phones that had to be connected by a wire, the miracle of the fax machine, boom boxes the size of small refrigerators, not being able to heat up food in 30 seconds and the like.

It’s interesting to those of us who do remember those things. It’s not interesting to them. In fact, read the preceding paragraph to a 17 year old and they will give you an eye roll followed by a dead fish stare that will drop the room temperature by 10 degrees.

In the early 80s, I got a phone call from my grandfather . He was about 85 at the time and had gotten an ATM card from Wells Fargo and was very excited about it. While many were leery of the idea of banking with a machine, he was thrilled. While others worried what would happen if the money didn’t come out or what if they had a question or what if someone somehow stole their money, his attitude was, “this is how banking is done now.” He lived to be a healthy, great looking guy to the age of 99 and I think that attitude had a lot to do with it. That and walking the hills of San Francisco for all those years.

An online degree is a great thing. Rather than words on a page, there is rich digital media that brings the lesson to life. Meeting someone online is often preferable now. The internet is de facto. I don’t know anyone who would debate that. But men and women of a certain age must for their own good let go of those old templates. You’re marketing and selling to people who have new templates and new expectations that have nothing to do with your own.

This is how it’s done now.

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Author: wordsrangtrue

Brian Boyd has served in sales management and operational executive roles in Silicon Valley for over 25 years. His interests include the business life, wine and the wine business, music, film and social media.

3 thoughts on “It’s Time to Forget Rotary Phones.”

  1. Just last week, a former rep of mine called me to be a reference. I asked him if he was on Linked in and Twitter. He said no. I told him that if if was interviewing him I would immediately count him out.

    I used to be a Luddite but I found out that nobody was impressed and it put no coin in my pocket

    Nice post.

  2. Hi Brian,

    Very good post and the ATM comment made me reflect on how crazy everyone thought I was when I raved about the ability to bank online.

    I am a friend of TMac and I look forward to reading your blog, especially after the “Dress for Success” comments. Priceless and True Tom

    “I was wearing my favorite gray, nailhead Canali suit and my new shoes. You looked down at the handmade, Italian monkstraps and said, “Interesting. Those look like Catholic schoolgirl shoes.”

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